The Gandhi experiment – Book Review

‘Transformative, practical, creative and inspirational’

The Gandhi Experiment - Book Review

Margaret Hepworth’s new book, The Gandhi Experiment – Teaching our teenagers how to become global citizens provides constructive lessons based on critical thinking, creativity, and positive education.

On January 30th we are reminded of the iconic figurehead, Mohandas K Gandhi, leader of the Indian independence movement, a proponent of civil rights and inner swaraj, whose ideas swept across India, and later found their way into the heads of Martin Luther King Jr, Nelson Mandela and many others of enormous influence.

Gandhiji’s spirit resides everywhere in the form of the message.. so we feel like thanking him for his teachings

Margaret Hepworth’s new book, The Gandhi Experiment – Teaching our teenagers how to become global citizens (Rupa, 2017) provides constructive lessons based on critical thinking, creativity, and positive education, for our young people – in fact, for us all. There is something in this book for every one of us. Hepworth is getting on with the job of being a change-maker.

If you want to ‘Be the change you want to see in this world’, then do yourself, and the children you know, a favor by purchasing this book.

Gandhiji believed that forgiveness is the attribute of the strong. In amongst the many offerings in Hepworth’s book, “The Best Forgiveness Role Play Ever” details the extraordinary method of forgiveness used by the Babemba tribe of South Africa. It is the most literal form of forgiveness I have ever heard of, teaching inclusivity and belongingness. Hepworth teaches it to us, step by step. I won’t give away the ‘secret’ of the role play’s success. You will have to read it for yourself to find out.

The chapter entitled, ‘Almost Impossible Thoughts’ inspires us to do more. It teaches young people how to step forward on their unique pathway to a better world. Yet it also recaptured my own vision for a better world, from my youth. I emerged feeling more engaged, more connected with the world. And therefore wanting to contribute more; to be part of the solutions, not propelling the problems.

‘Transformative, practical, creative and inspirational’ are the words I choose to describe The Gandhi Experiment – Teaching our teenagers how to become global citizens. If you want to ‘Be the change you want to see in this world’, then do yourself, and the children you know, a favor by purchasing this book. Then apply the lessons within.


Note:
1. The views expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of PGurus.

Jayabala Girish

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